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AMAT Celebrates Black History Month

By | February 2nd, 2015

Velma Scantlebury M.D.

Dr. Velma Scantlebury was the first Black female transplant surgeon in the U.S.

The Association for Multicultural Affairs in Transplantation (AMAT) will celebrate Black History Month by recognizing an extraordinary woman and man who have made an indelible mark on the field of organ and tissue donation and transplantation, and highlight the need for organ donation and transplants within the African American community, which is disproportionately at risk for end-stage organ failure.

Dr. Velma Scantlebury is the first Black female transplant surgeon in the United States. Since beginning her work in the field of transplantation in 1989, she has performed more than 1,000 kidney transplants, while educating the public about organ donation and encouraging more minorities to become donors. She is extremely passionate about her work in the community, and has vowed that she will not be satisfied until “the number of African Americans donating equals the number that needs to be transplanted.”

The hard work  by these African American trailblazers has motivated individuals throughout the country to share the message of organ donation within countless Black communities because the need is so great.

Dr. Clive O. Callender is equally passionate about educating minority communities about organ and tissue donation. He founded the Howard University Transplant Center and the National Minority Organ Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP). He has shaped the dialogue among some of the nation’s most promising medical students and professionals as a professor at Howard University.

Dr. Clive Callender interviews with the media.

Dr. Clive Callender conducts an interview.

Dr. Callender has presented at more than 1,000 meetings highlighting organ donation throughout the United States, authored dozens of scientific publications on transplantation, and educated countless individuals in his community about the need for an increase of Black organ donors.

The hard work and determination exhibited by these African American physicial trailblazers has motivated individuals throughout the country to share the message of organ and tissue donation within countless Black communities because the need is great:

  • African Americans make up 13% of the U.S. population, yet comprise 34% of those waiting for a kidney and 24% of those waiting for a heart.
  • African Americans are three times more likely than Caucasians to suffer from end-stage renal (kidney) disease, often as the result of high blood pressure, diabetes and other conditions that can damage the kidneys.
  • 30% of those currently waiting for an organ donation are African American.

Signing up to be an organ donor is easy! Simply log on to DonateLife.net, click the “Register Now” button, choose your state from the map and sign up on that registry. In less than five minutes you can join millions of other Americans who have vowed to save lives by becoming an organ and tissue donor. Your “yes” can make a difference in the lives of many. Sign up today and be sure to talk to your loved ones about your decision.

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  • Association for Multicultural Affairs in Transplantation
    10825 Midlothian Turnpike, Suite 201R
    Richmond, VA 23235
    1-844-654-(AMAT) 2628